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edible Monterey Bay Summer 2015

14 edible monterey bay Summer 2015 The project itself is now in search of a home where all its programs can be housed. Discussions with the City of Santa Cruz are underway to hammer out details of moving to the iconic Pogonip property, once home to polo grounds and golf links, and owned by the city as greenbelt property since 1988. “It would mean so much to have a permanent site,” says Ganzhorn, who notes that final approval from the city council may come as soon as this fall. HGP’s goals for the future include “a world-class farm at Pogonip,” says Ganzhorn, and continuing to build the farm and enterprises. Also envisioned are partnerships with local businesses and a strong alumni program to add to the effectiveness of its training and transitional employment program. In the meantime, the Homeless Garden Project will celebrate its quarter-century birthday with a series of benefit events later this year, starting with an Aug. 22 gala farm supper featuring renowned chef and cookbook author, Deborah Madison, and another on Sept. 19. A 50- mile cycling event, the Swanton Loop Challenge, is set for Oct. 24. Such fundraisers are vital to keeping the project going, since these events account for more than 10% of this year’s funding, Ganzhorn says. Donations, in fact, make up more than half of HGP’s income, with 40% percent coming from project enterprises. (See “Get Your Farm Fix On,” p. 52, for ways to support it.) “Even more important, we think it’s almost impossible to come to a farm dinner and not walk away in awe of the power of food and the farm to connect people,” says Ganzhorn. “Our dinner guests do much more than support our programs with the price of their ticket—they walk away with an experience of the power of our mission, and we hope, a commitment to helping us achieve it.” Homeless Garden Project Downtown Santa Cruz store: 110 Cooper St., Ste. 100G Farm and Farm stand: Shaffer Road at Delaware Avenue 831.426.3609 • www.homelessgardenproject.org Kathryn McKenzie writes about sustainable living, home design and horticulture for numerous publications and websites and, when not at the computer, attempts to grow tomatoes at her home in foggy northern Monterey County. Nurturing lives: Homeless Garden Project executive director Darrie Ganzhorn (top) says that the daily lunches made from the farm’s produce each day and shared together by trainees, volunteers and staff (center) are community-building experiences.


edible Monterey Bay Summer 2015
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